Saturday, July 15, 2006

Spinning for socks, mixing wools?


I need some input on mixing wools. If I spin yarn for socks. If I do it in different colors so I can do colorwork. Do I have to use all the same kind of wool from same sheep? Can I mix and match my fibers? Can I use brown BFL and white Corriedale and even some colored fiber throwed in? Spinners please help out with this. The yarn I make would not really all have to be the same size right? Suggestions Please!!

8 comments:

mf said...

LOL!!!! I would try to stick with certain fibers, or the same fiber unless it's already blended or you blend it yourself. Dorcet is wonderful for socks!

AR said...

Sorry I can't help with the spinning question, but I had to say : Cute picture! That's my kind of sheep!!

Nancy J said...

Absolutely you Can mix your fibers. Not a problem at all! I've mixed fibers a lot over my years of spinning. Never had a problem.

Joni said...

I don't think mixing wools is a problem, but I would stick within a certain range of quality. I would put BFL and Corriedale in the same class, based on the spinning fibers I've had from those breeds.

What I wouldn't do is use superwash wool and non-superwash wool in the same project. Superwash wool often needs to go in the dryer for at least a bit to retain its shape or it gets saggy-baggy. Whereas you know what will happen if you put non-superwash wool in the dryer. Not good, you would want all the fibers in your sock to be compatible regarding laundering requirements.

la petit chat noir said...

Jeannie,

Check out Merike Saarnit's article on Spinning for Socks in Spring 2006 Spin Off magazine if you can. You can and should mix various types of wool [or other] fiber to get a yarn you like for the kind of socks you want. Consider appearance, durability, and ease of care/cleaning for the purpose you intend to use the socks for. Mohair is very strong and elastic. Angora is delicate and felts easily. Silk hankies blended with something stronger can add color and luster. You might consider carding and spinning woolen if you have lots of different staple lengths to mix. I think worsted is preferred for durability in socks if you have a choice. You can use one blend of yarn for the cuffs and tops of the socks and a sturdier blend for the soles and heels. I recently got a free rather kempy/hairy fleece of very short staple fiber from a California Varietal Mutant sheep. I finally decided to wash part of it and try to prepare and spin some samples. The result was a very strong and pretty oatmeal yarn with red flecks from the hair which I think will be very nice for socks. If it's too rough for the body of the socks I can dye it and use for the soles. I have some other very soft yarn I can dye for the body and blend, but it would not hold up for the soles.

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